The National Army Museum is the British Army’s central museum. It is located in the Chelsea district of central London, adjacent to the Royal Hospital Chelsea, the home of the “Chelsea Pensioners”. The museum is a non-departmental public body. The National Army Museum is usually open to the public every day of the year from 10.00am to 5.30pm, except on 24–26 December and 1 January, with free admission.
The National Army Museum was first conceived in the late 1950s, and owes its existence to the persistent hard work of Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, who did most of the fundraising for it.  It was established by Royal Charter in 1960, with the intention of collecting, preserving, and exhibiting objects and records relating to the Regular and Auxiliary forces of the British Army and of the Commonwealth, and to encourage research into their history and traditions. It was initially established in 1960 in temporary accommodation at the former No.1 Riding School at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

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A new purpose-built building, designed in brutalist style by William Holford & Partners, was started in 1961 on a site which had previously formed part of the old infirmary of the Royal Hospital Chelsea. The new building was completed ten years later and opened by the Queen on 11 November 1971.(Ref:wiki)



Opening hours
Museum and Shop
Open daily: 10am – 5.30pm
(Last admission: 5pm)
Closed: 25, 26 December and 1 January
Open until 8pm on the first Wednesday of every month.


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